The Witching Hour

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I’ve recently began reading the Witching Hour by Anne Rice again.  I read it for the first time in 2000 and  I remember picking up that big book and thinking I would never get through  all 1056 pages, but at the same time loving the feel of that huge book in my hands.

The Witching Hour centers around the family of witches, in New Orleans,  known as the Mayfairs, and they are connected to the legacy of a ghost named Lasher who bonds with one female of the Mayfair family from as early as the 1600s when people were being burned alive for being a witch to present day Louisiana.

When the female Mayfair he has attached himself to dies, he takes up with her daughter until she dies and then moves again to the next in line, right up until now when he has attached himself to the main character,  Rowan Mayfair.   Lasher provides the Mayfairs with riches beyond their dreams, but it all comes with a awful price for each member of the family.  The story of  Lasher is a  mystery,  and a Paranormal Group known as the Talamasca have followed this family and their ghost since the 1600s to present day when  Rowan Mayfair (who was adopted and grew up in California and knows nothing of her families history) takes responsibility, when the mother she never really knew, dies. No one really knows where Lasher came from and it’s up to Rowan to figure it out with the help of the Talamasca.

There is an enormous amount of  complex historical information related to the Mayfairs, but it is told so well that you’re immediately caught up right from the start.  There are several more books in the series that I will eventually re-read as well.

I don’t usually re-read books, but the Witching Hour came across on my Kindle and I remembered how much I loved that book and the stories that were told in it.  It’s 1056 pages long and has kept me busy for hours at a time the last few days.  I vaguely remember the premise, but I’m now remembering why I loved it so much the first time I read it, over 10 years ago.

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